,

Facebook Ads “Too Much Text” Guideline is Stupid

We’re running some ads on Facebook to subscribers of the MarTech Blog newsletter to also join our community on Facebook. To do this, we exported the subscribers from our email list that were most active and created a group in Facebook to target them specifically. One of the first ads I designed was an image that displayed many of our infographics as that’s always a focus for our readers… but it was disapproved instantly because it had too much text.

facebook-mtb-infographics

Even after I reduced the bottom text, it still picked up the text within the infographics and disapproved it. This is quite bizarre… the text isn’t actually any message, it’s just the aesthetic. I can understand if I had a huge BUY NOW text overlay. That would be both distracting and wouldn’t allow the image to be what it’s really about, an accent to the title and description.

So, I updated the image to this one:

Too much text

It’s a beautiful image both clean and catches the eye. Not because of the text, which is again, just a design aesthetic to the overall image. There’s no message within the text, no unrelated verbiage, nothing offensive… just a beautiful design. The ad was initially approved and then I received this note this morning:

too-much-text-email

Sorry Facebook, this is the dumbest thing I’ve ever seen. You state on your guidelines:

Images in your ads can include text that meets our general Advertising Guidelines, but may not include more than 20% text in the image to ensure people only see high-quality content.

Please explain how this graphic that I uploaded is not high-quality content?

Download a Sponsored Marketing Whitepaper:
The Ultimate Guide to Scaling Your Facebook Advertising

The Ultimate Guide to Scaling Your Facebook Advertising

If you've been happy with your customer acquisition from Facebook lately, it's time to think about scaling. Download Now

2 Comments

  1. 1
    • 2

      We’ve had some good results with targeted campaigns, and I can even empathize that tons of verbiage in an image could be distracting. However, there’s a huge difference between distraction and aesthetics that I believe they could fine tune. It’s not as subjective as one might believe.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.