Mobile and Tablet Marketing

Google Announces $1B Revenue Share Program with YOU!

It’s not true, just link bait.

Metacafe, a search and ranking system for videos, just surpassed $1,000,000 in shared revenue with its content creators. Mike reports that Revver also hit the $1,000,000 in shared revenue this year as well.

I’ve been critical of Google’s attack on content providers who solicit payment for link placement. Michael Graywolf has as well… he’s also taking major websites to task for caving to the Google Powers-That-Be.

Google claims that it’s simply trying to maintain its organic search results truly organic. The gray area of Google Terms of Service continue to blur, though. Most recently, Matt Cutts may have suggested that ALL links in a sponsored post must also be properly labeled with nofollow tags – not just the paid link provider.

As one of those ‘content providers’, I tend to view paid links a little differently. Just as Metacafe and Revver have recognized that they do not have a viable business without the associated providers, perhaps Google should as well.

If Google was serious about eliminating paid links, then they should share the revenue for my organic content that they are profiting from (by tagging with their own sponsored links). Why not pay me for the volume of great content that I allow Google to provide users with?

Google does not own the Internet, folks. It’s your content, not Google’s. We’re so busy scurrying to get Google’s attention half the time that we tend to forget this. Google’s done a masterful job in positioning themselves ‘above’ everyone else on the net.

Perhaps it’s time for a new Search Engine with a new business model?

7 Comments

  1. 1

    I never heard of the metacafe before having an affiliate program I heard of revver shared revenue program that this month I made almost $40, which is more than I made in Google adsense go figure. I believe google should have shared content for organic results and also believe they should monetize youtube for the whole public instead of a few selected particpaants

  2. 2

    I read a lot of bad articles when people complain about Google paid links policy and organic rankings.’
    This article is the only one which explains a lot bringing real facts.
    From my side I would like to support everything you are saying.

  3. 3

    Both Google and Yahoo for that matter have imposed a set of rules on users that benefit only Google and Yahoo and not the community of users. Obviously you’re right…the Internet and the content placed on it by the users belong to the users, not to the directories and to the search engines. The challenge is that as usual, the monetizing aspect is what drives the system and as long as there are those trying to take advantage of getting a quick buck, they will have the upper hand unless government…that bad word…steps in…go figure.

    Thanks for speaking up.

  4. 4
  5. 5

    Also, very relevant here: my favorite book (ever?) “New Rules for the New Economy” by Kevin Kelley talks about how the “superwinners” gain from the “winner-take-most” environment of the network economy in Chapter 2 which you can read online. It (and the whole book) are definitely worth a read. Oh, BTW, it was written before Google even existed (or at least before they were well known.)

  6. 6

    Perhaps it’s time for a new Search Engine with a new business model?We tend to forget just how new and in a state of flux the internet is.  I remember crying the day Northern Light closed its public search…and that was ONLY from a consumer perspective.  Everything is possilbe and in this case hopeful, but I think Google is in the “too big to fail” category…because as you said…they are the leaders because the consumer “treats” them that way…and they happily oblige.  Pretty much the same way societies have always thought – “ah, just leave it alone and let me “get mine”..cuz there’s nothing you can do about it anyway.”  So sad.  Thanks for the article.

  7. 7

    Perhaps it’s time for a new Search Engine with a new business model?We tend to forget just how new and in a state of flux the internet is.  I remember crying the day Northern Light closed its public search…and that was ONLY from a consumer perspective.  Everything is possilbe and in this case hopeful, but I think Google is in the “too big to fail” category…because as you said…they are the leaders because the consumer “treats” them that way…and they happily oblige.  Pretty much the same way societies have always thought – “ah, just leave it alone and let me “get mine”..cuz there’s nothing you can do about it anyway.”  So sad.  Thanks for the article.

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