Marketing Infographics,

Is Social Media Turning Us Into Psychopaths?

Time for some Friday fun! Many people unfollow me and don’t appreciate my blunt force social tactics online. I’m not sure anyone has classified me as a psychopath publicly or not, but there are probably a couple folks wondering. I don’t believe I am – but I am passionate in my debates online. I even get heated once in a while – but I still try to show respect for others’ opinions.

The long-term impact of spending one’s life in the real world while constantly connected to the virtual one is not yet fully understood. While treatment for Internet addiction has been available since the mid-’90s, it’s worth noting that more people than ever before are exhibiting the ironically anti-social behaviors now associated with spending too much time online.From WhoIsHostingThis’s infographic, Is Social Media Turning Us Into Psychopaths?

At the root of my personal activity online is the fact that I’m public and transparent in my identity. I’m accountable to the things that I say online because I put my name and my photo on it. I don’t do anything under anonymity. It’s my belief that much of the psychopathic behavior we see online is because there are no repercussions to people lashing out or being mean online when they’re hiding behind the cloak of anonymity. I don’t believe people are any more mean online than they ever have been in real life… but it’s easier to be psychopathic when you’re not held personally accountable.

Social Psychopath

5 Comments

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    It has NOTHING to do with social media. That is merely where the problem is more visual and where the info is to collaborate the study. It has EVERYTHING to do with the fact that Americans…..are OBSESSED with work. Everything in their lives revolves around some aspect of work, and few get vacations anymore. When people don’t get enough time to spend with their children(our FUTURE leaders etc) the children don’t learn how to talk about things with their parents. Many aren’t learning the very emotions that separate us from animals. I’ve seen it in all income levels. The high earners are often at work or away and spend very little time raising the tax credit, I mean child***. Ask any nanny or au pair, it’s sad, yet truly disgusting at the same time. As for low wage earners….many are working two jobs etc to provide and again…..children aren’t being raised properly. It’s sad all around…..don’t dare say Germany etc are the same, they are VERY different when it comes to family time off(it’s not always the mother), vacation time, etc. There is a better way of helping out our families. I read articles all the time talking about how Americans are the most efficient workers anywhere…..then go to 6 hr workdays and raise your d*** children!!!

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      I believe I’m one of those Americans that you speak of @driventowin:disqus! However, I would disagree that I made a choice of work OVER family. I always did both and have an incredible relationship with my children (I was a single father). I don’t believe you have to sacrifice one for the other. And I would never put my family last.

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        That’s awesome to hear man, it truly is. I see so many families where you only know they’re a family b/c they arrive and leave together. Others are so strained from economic stressors that they can’t enjoy life. Did you get set up before you had kids? Or do everything after? Much easier to do if you have kids after, but it can be done.

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          It wasn’t until I started my own business (with $0 and my son starting college) that I had the freedom to fully mix the two! I believe I work many more hours than the average American – but a lot of it is outside family time from midnight to 4AM 🙂

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