Jetpack: How To Record And View A Comprehensive Security & Activity Log For Your WordPress Site

There are quite a few security plugins available to monitor your WordPress instance. Most are focused on identifying users who have logged in and may have made changes to your site that could pose a security risk or configured a plugin or theme that may break it. Having an activity log is an ideal way to way to track these issues and changes down. Unfortunately, there’s one thing in common with most of the third-party

Google Search Console Goofed And Sent False Alerts on WordPress

Sometimes I scratch my head where exactly Google is going with its search console. While I do believe it’s an amazing service to detect malware on sites and prevent those sites from being listed in search results, I’m not so sure I want Google actually scanning sites looking for issues. Case in point was a premature alert that went out to me and, I’m guessing, tens of thousands of sites that stated they were running

WordPress Safety and Security

Our site is hosted on Flywheel and we’re also affiliates because we believe it’s the best WordPress hosting platform on the planet. Because of WordPress’s popularity, it’s become a popular target of hackers. That doesn’t mean it can’t be a secure platform, though, it just means that it’s in every user’s best interest to ensure they maintain the platform, the plugins and keep their sites safe. We let Flywheel do much of this for us!

Don’t Blame WordPress

90,000 hackers are trying to get into your WordPress installation right now. That’s a ridiculous statistic but also points to the popularity of the world’s most popular content management system. While we’re fairly agnostic about content management systems, we have a deep, deep respect for WordPress and support most of our clients’ installations on it. I don’t necessarily agree with the founder of WordPress who largely deflects the attention on security issues with the CMS.