Content Marketing, Marketing Training

What is your Unique Value Proposition (UVP)?

Unique Value Propositions (UVP) have been around in the sales world for quite a while. Your Unique Value Proposition was a short statement that encompassed the services you’ve provided and how you differentiate yourself from your competitors. Unique Value Propositions on the web are a bit different – typically it’s a call-out to a very specific offer or benefit of doing business with the company.

Your site’s unique value proposition has to accomplish three things:

  • It must capture the visitor’s attention. Example: Everyday Free Shipping on the Gap’s web page.
  • It must be easy to understand. Example: Formstack’s Free 14 Day offer.
  • It must differentiate you from your competitors online. If your list of value propositions is similar to your competitors, focus on one that they are not focused on. Example: Our blog provides us a strategic advantage in performing content strategies because we also have a huge audience to share with… we don’t have to pay for outreach, we’ve got it!
  • It must be enticing enough to actually sway the visitor’s purchase decision. Example: We offer a 30 day out to our sponsors since we believe in our value and want to ensure our client’s success.

In the ecommerce industry, there are several common unique value propositions… speed of delivery, cost of shipping, return policies, low price guarantees, transaction security, in-stock status. All of which are utilized to increase trust and get the visitor to a sale without them leaving the site and comparison shopping somewhere else. For your product or service, you need to be creative… is it your resources? Location? Experience? Clients? Quality? Cost?

TIP: Before you move forward with what you think is your Unique Value Proposition… ask your current clients or customers! You may be surprised that it’s not what you actually believe it to be.

After you determine your unique value proposition, you need to embed it into your site in a manner that captures the user’s attention. I would recommend designing a call-to-action and having an accompanied landing page that fully defines the UVP. You’ll want to discuss how NOT going with a company that has your Unique Value Proposition will lead the prospect into problems down the road.

One great example is Lifeline Data Centers, a midwest colocation facility and client of ours. They have more room for scaling than any other competitor in the Midwest. As well, they’re currently building office space into their facilities. The combination is so unique that we’re working with them on a site and brand redesign that will fully encompass the differentiation!

Your UVP may not lead to an entire rebranding… but it should be obvious from your web presence what your unique value proposition is!

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