Content Marketing,

Social Media and Success: Cutting vs Prolonging

Much of marketing success really comes down to two actions, cutting and prolonging. As we see a marketing strategy dry up and produce less results, the quicker we cut… the better our overall strategy performs. Likewise, as we see a strategy produce great results… we work hard to prolong the results.

As an example, I try to do this on a daily basis with the blog. When I notice that their are a lot of Facebook likes but not a lot of Twitter retweets, I’ll push it out there again. If I see a ton of reaction via Twitter and Facebook, I’ll push it to StumbleUpon. When I see the topic grow significantly, I’ll write more about that topic, perhaps schedule a Marketing Tech Radio show about it, or even plan a video.

One tactic that I’ve seen really work on the blog is the addition of a variety of marketing infographics. The site has grown between 10% and 15% over the last couple months with the additional feature. As a result, we’ve got alerts set up for them and we’re now engaging graphic designers to develop our own. The latest one on how mobile is impacting ecommerce was an idea I had after reading a whitepaper… so we didn’t even have to do the research!

Momentum is key to a lot of cross-channel marketing, so the longer your can prolong a popular strategy, the better the overall results of your campaigns. We don’t just see this online, we see it off-line as well. If a commercial resonates with the audience… like Flo, the Progressive Lady, we see a series of commercials with the Progressive Lady.

It’s not just in marketing, either. It’s a fact of life that we need to cut the bad and prolong the good. I need to cut my eating habits and learn how to prolong my exercise. In work, I need to cut clients who aren’t listening to us or getting results, and work harder on prolonging the relationship with the companies who do listen and are successful.

Back to marketing.

Many companies are so familiar and comfortable with some marketing efforts that they simply don’t cut them… even when they’re failing. I think it’s a natural mechanism by marketers who become very comfortable with the medium. Their minds are simply closed to alternatives. Email marketers lean on email, search marketers lean on search, paid advertising marketers lean on ads… it’s a vicious circle that inevitably ends up in failed campaigns and lots of lost revenue.

On the contrary, many marketers don’t pay attention to analytics and don’t even realize what’s working or what’s not. They don’t prolong any of their efforts across channels. Each campaign starts from scratch without a care in the world. This makes them unable to capitalize on the momentum they already had put in place.

Social media offers us a means of prolonging every campaign. As David Murdico I spoke about video marketing strategies on the last radio show, we spoke about how incredible it is to already have a set of fans and followers in place. As you grow your social network of fans and followers, you’re investing in the success of your next campaign and your overall marketing strategy.

In essence, that investment in a social following is prolonging your next campaign… before you ever planned it’s execution! If you have 100,000 followers in place that are listening and have provided you with permission to contact them, how would that change your next marketing campaign? I hope it’s something you’re thinking about.

Leave a Reply