Amazon, Ecommerce and Retail, Instagram Marketing, Marketing Infographics

The 6 Roadblocks to Going Global with Your E-Commerce

Global Commerce Roadblocks

The shift to omnichannel selling is widely apparent, most recently supported by Nike’s move to sell on both Amazon and Instagram. However, the switch to cross-channel commerce isn’t easy. Merchants and suppliers struggle to keep product information consistent and accurate across all platforms – so much so that 78% of merchants simply can’t keep up with enhanced consumer demands for transparency.

45% of merchants and suppliers have lost $1+ mil in revenue due to challenges faced when integrating cross-channel capabilities  Tweet This! into their commerce strategy.

1WorldSync, a leading provider of product content solutions, recently released the infographic below based on the Charting the Course for Global Commerce study.

Download the Study

Common Roadblocks to Going Global with E-Commerce

The infographic highlights common omnichannel barriers for merchants and suppliers, as well as how market leaders are overcoming those roadblocks through the use of cloud-based product information systems.

  1. Connectivity – existing product information systems don’t provide a single platform to set up and exchange quality product content with trading partners.
  2. Exchange – existing product information systems don’t meet the standards of their trading partners.
  3. Compliance – suppliers struggle to keep up with different regulatory standards across countries.
  4. Quality – merchants can’t provide compelling, engaging product descriptions and images sourced directly from supplier partners.
  5. Omnichannel – merchants struggle to aggregate and distribute complete, consistent, and trusted product information across all channels.
  6. Transparency – merchants can’t keep up with enhanced consumer demands for product transparency.

Global Commerce Infographic

One comment

  1. 1

    In our quest to add on drop shipping products from China, there seems to be one consistent factor, and it appears that you’ve hit the nail on the head. It’s old fashioned communication and trust. One, you have to make certain that you (and your vendor) are speaking the same language both literally and figuratively.

    We’ve been fortunate enough, and I say this with a HUMONGOUS tongue in cheek, in the US to somehow remain off of the metric system as a means of how we measure and weigh items.

    In addition, there is the currency issue. Currency fluctuates rapidly, what could’ve once been a great arbitrage deal can quickly turn into a not so great deal after all. In the drop shipping world, it should go without saying that you hope and pray that your shipper understood the request that they’d refrain from letting the buyer know that you’d just paid .75 for those kitten mittens, while they’d just paid you 9. A difficult bit of communication indeed.

    It all comes down to good communication. Hopefully as our use of similar forms of SaaS, the ability to communicate will become much easier.

    Now after writing all of that, I should’ve just said, “Ditto”. 😉

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