Content Marketing

Flat-Headed Squirrels and Kamikazes

This afternoon I interviewed Matt Nettleton. Matt is a professional sales trainer and my personal sales coach here in Indianapolis. The work that he’s accomplished thus far has changed my (negative) attitude on selling and actually honed my marketing skills.

Sales is a lot more difficult than it used to be… by the time folks are calling your sales team, they are very well-informed. I believe it’s caused a huge shift in the system where sales is much more difficult than it used to be and is best left to the professionals. If you’re not a qualified sales person nowadays, you’re simply an order taker.

As a coach, Matt prequalifies the prospects he wishes to work with using 5 distinct characteristics:

  1. Desire – does the prospect have the desire to change?
  2. Commitment – is the prospect committed?
  3. Return on Investment – is there a Return on Investment on the client?
  4. Intellectual Humility – does the client understand that they have the expertise but still require you to unleash it?
  5. Decisiveness – is the prospect ready to make decisions that will change their behavior?

If you’d like to understand why I called this post Flat-Headed Squirrels and Kamikazes, be sure to click through to the post for the audio. Matt is quite a colorful person with some great analogies.
[audio:https://martech.zone/wp-content/uploads/podcast/matt_nettleton.mp3]

As online marketing grows in its acceptance as an inbound marketing strategy for generating highly qualified leads, your website or blog must do a better job at defining what makes a good client for your organization. Less work with unqualified leads and more time with leads that close is always a good thing.

Is your website effectively communicating what a highly qualified lead looks like to your organization? Hopefully, your website displays enough information to generate interest in your product or service, provides a clear picture of what an ideal client is, and doesn’t provide too much information that a great lead leaves without engaging. It’s a careful balance!

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