Marketing Infographics, Search Marketing, WordPress

How to Speed Up Your WordPress Site

We’ve written, to a great extent, the impact of speed on your users’ behavior. And, of course, if there’s an impact on user behavior, there’s an impact on search engine optimization. Most people don’t realize the number of factors involved in the simple process of typing in a web page and having that page load for you.

Now that half of almost all site traffic is mobile, it’s also imperative to have lightweight, really fast pages so that your users don’t bounce. It’s such a huge issue that Google has developed Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) to address the issue. If you’re a publisher, I’d encourage you to configure and display AMP versions of your pages.

If you are a WordPress user, then you are most probably experiencing its most common problem, which is its slow processing. Slow processing of WordPress becomes a real problem when your work is affected by the unavailability of your site.

This fantastic infographic from Blogging Basics 101 walks through a logical process of improving the performance of WordPress.

  1. Troubleshoot the issues that may be slowing down your site. Keep in mind that your site may run quite well in slow traffic times, then come to a screeching halt when you need it to perform best – with a lot of simultaneous visitors.
  2. Remove unnecessary plugins that cause excessive stress on your database or load too many elements on your external pages. Administrative tools don’t have a significant impact, so don’t worry about them as much.
  3. Optimize your database for faster queries. If that sounds like French to you, no worries. Databases operate much faster when the data is indexed properly within them. Many hosts don’t optimize your database automatically, but there are a number of plugins that do. Just be sure to backup your data first!
  4. Content Delivery Networks quickly deliver your static content regionally to your readers. We’ve written a great overview, What’s a CDN? to help you understand.
  5. Speed Up Image Issues by reducing your image sizes without sacrificing quality. We use Optimus from KeyCDN on our site and it’s been rock solid. You can also lazy load images so they only actually appear when the user scrolls to them within view.
  6. Caching is provided by our host, Flywheel. If your host doesn’t provide caching, there are some great plugins out there that will help you. We recommend WP Rocket for those that want to avoid all the tweaking of the other plugins out there.
  7. Minimize and Minify Your Code, reducing both the number of files that are retrieved and removing any unnecessary space within your HTML, JavaScript and CSS. We’ve been using Autoptimize to do this and it’s worked well – we have sometimes had to adjust which scripts were loaded and how.
  8. Social Media Sharing buttons are a must for any site, but the social sites won’t work together and have done a terrible job at ensuring their buttons don’t pull a site to a screeching halt. We really love all the customization that Shareaholic provides – and you can even monitize your site using their platform.

Do you know whether or not your site is down altogether? I’d encourage you to load and configure Jetpack‘s plugin so that you can monitor your WordPress site’s downtime. It’s a free service and great to know how often your site is having performance issues. Here’s the full infographic!

How to Speed Up WordPress

 

 

6 Comments

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    Setup. It took 22 seconds down download and update. And 2 minutes of me looking around and going, “wait, that’s it?”

    Any word on when pages, categories, and archives are going to get the same love?

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    Really Nice article. I found more points than any other speed optimization posts.
    I followed some of your points now my page speed is below 700ms. before it was 2.10s. Thanks for this awesome article, sure i will share this with my blogger friends.
    regards,
    kathir.

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